Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Group Ride Ettiquete  (Read 11373 times)

Offline Jay

  • mmm...beer
  • Administrator
  • Post Whore
  • *****
  • Posts: 5131
    • View Profile
    • jayt.org
Group Ride Ettiquete
« on: August 20, 2008, 03:20:36 PM »
This is a work in progress, please post anything you would like me to add.
This is based off the MSF guide, with additions form other sources.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Motorcycling is primarily a solo activity, but for many, riding as a group -- whether with friends on a Sunday morning ride or with an organized motorcycle rally -- is the epitome of the motorcycling experience. Here are some tips to help ensure a fun and safe group ride:

Arrive prepared
Arrive on time with a full gas tank.

Hold a ridersí meeting
Discuss things like the route, rest and fuel stops, and hand signals (see diagrams on next page). Assign a lead and sweep (tail) rider. Both should be experienced riders who are well-versed in group riding procedures. The leader should assess everyoneís riding skills and the groupís riding style.

Keep the group to a manageable size
Ideally five to seven riders. If necessary, break the group into smaller sub-groups, each with a lead and sweep rider.

Ride prepared
At least one rider in each group should pack a cell phone, first-aid kit, and full tool kit, so the group is prepared for any problem that they might encounter.

Ride in formation The staggered riding formation (see diagram below) allows a proper space cushion between motorcycles so that each rider has enough time and space to maneuver and to react to hazards. The leader rides in the left third of the lane, while the next rider stays at least one second behind in the right third of the lane; the rest of the group follows the same pattern. A single-file formation is preferred on a curvy road, under conditions of poor visibility or poor road surfaces, entering/leaving highways, or other situations where an increased space cushion or maneuvering room is needed. As turns get sharper, or as visibility decreases, move back to a single file formation. You'll also want to use single file when entering or exiting a highway, at toll booths, or when roads have a rough or questionable surface. At intersections where you've come to a stop, tighten the formation to side-by-side to take up less space. As the light turns green, or when traffic opens up, the bike on the left proceeds through first.



Avoid side-by-side formations
as they reduce the space cushion. If you suddenly needed to swerve to avoid a hazard, you would not have room to do so. You donít want handlebars to get entangled.

Periodically check the riders following in your rear view mirror
If you see a rider falling behind, slow down so they may catch up. If all the riders in the group use this technique, the group should be able to maintain a fairly steady speed without pressure to ride too fast to catch up.

If youíre separated from the group, donít panic
Your group should have a pre-planned procedure in place to regroup.

Donít break the law or ride beyond your skills to catch up
For mechanical or medical problems, use a cell phone to call for assistance as the situation warrants. If the group is riding faster than you are comfortable with, let the sweep rider know you're dropping out and ride at your own pace. So you may reach your destination a few seconds behind the others, but you will get there, and that's what's important. Keep in mind, it's all about fun.


Leader
The Lead Bike rides in the most forward position in the group and relays information to all other riders via hand signals. The Lead Bike determines the group's direction, speed, choice of lane and formation. He/she must often make quick navigation decisions in the face of road hazards, changes of road surface conditions, poor signage, construction and other obstacles while maintaining control of his/her own bike and communicating to those following in the group.

Setting the Pace: speed control is important and involves proper changes depending on circumstances. Open road speed should be paced at legal speed limits (or lower depending on conditions), pre-mature slowing should be used when approaching a turn or major change in lane position, and speed should be increased initially coming out of a turn to allow space for others to make the turn. Once the turn is made, speed should be maintained at 5 mph slower until the entire group is together and the Sweeper signals that the group is ready to proceed.

Knowing the Route: The planned route is important, and the destination is "all" important. Sometimes routes change based upon weather or road conditions. The Leader needs to know how to get the group to the final destination. Hopefully, the planned ride will suffice, but alternate routes need to be known.

Hand Signals: and the understanding of their usage is essential.

The Leader also works in conjunction with the Sweeper to insure that the ride is staying organized and together.

Sweeper
This very important position is often overlooked, but can be a critical part of the successful and safe group ride. The Sweeper sees all... because they take the "last" position in the group. And, the responsibilities of this position can be varied and multiple. Some European riding group go so far to make sure that the Sweeper has medical training as well. After all... if an accident occurs in the group, they are the first on the scene.

Signaling
The Sweeper communicates to the Leader, through hand signals, the status of the group. The most used signal is a fist high in the air signaling to the Leader that everyone is together and made it through that traffic light or turn. The Leader should "acknowledge" this by signaling back the same way. This also helps to remove the anxiety of the riders in the group, wondering how everyone is doing. Other signals can be used and should be discussed directly between the Leader and Sweeper to insure proper communication.

If the group becomes separated, the Sweeper now must jump to a lead position and become a Leader

Help
If there is a problem, it becomes the Sweeper's responsibility to oversee, and communicate appropriately so that help can be notified as necessary. Obviously, the Sweeper should be equipped with a cell phone, radio or device capable of doing so.

Signals



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Motorcycle riding is dangerous by nature. If you choose to partake in a CTRiders group ride, it is at your own risk. CTRiders will not be held accountable for reckless and dangerous riding. It is your choice to twist the throttle.

Most importantly: stay within your limits. There is no pressure to ride above your abilities.

After the Ride
After you have returned home from the ride, please check into the corresponding thread. We all would like to know you got home safely.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2009, 11:20:28 AM by JBLoudG20 »
-Jay

Yev

  • Guest
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2008, 03:30:11 PM »
Very nice addition Jay..

CTBumpkin

  • Guest
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2008, 04:47:50 PM »
In some parts of the state, patting your helmet means, "Po Po, slow down."

Offline SkiMan

  • Pit Crew
  • I post a lot
  • *****
  • Posts: 3691
    • View Profile
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2008, 05:10:46 PM »
JB
Nice job on the outline
This type of stuff should be a mandatory read
and included in the rider safety course (none of this was covered when I took it)
This is going to get posted in the shop where I can see it and review
"Four wheels move the body, two wheels move the soul"

Mr.P

  • Guest
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2008, 09:21:47 AM »
Thanxs jb.Very informative.I too will have to keep it posted and review it from time to time.

Mr.P

beet

  • Guest
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2009, 09:36:00 AM »
LOL tap on top of helmet used to be LEO spotted. ;D

Offline GerryP

  • Ice Cream in his Veins
  • Pit Crew
  • Rossi Sr.
  • *****
  • Posts: 1824
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2009, 10:35:54 AM »


Let's not forget the "old" arm signals for left and right turns (which I try to as much as possible), after all bulbs burn out.

Gerry
2015 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Red)

Motorcycling - It's not about what you ride or how fast you ride....is all about the ICE CREAM!!

hondanick52

  • Guest
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2009, 09:28:34 AM »
I was kind of looking forward to riding with you guys but it seams a little uptight for me, i ride in groups of 20 and we have no trouble staying together. It also seams like you are pretty adament about not breaking any laws while your with the group. why dont you come down off your responcible pedestal and have some fun. You must have known how at one time because you ride a motorcycle, seams to me tho that your a lil more into preaching than riding at this point.

Offline Jay

  • mmm...beer
  • Administrator
  • Post Whore
  • *****
  • Posts: 5131
    • View Profile
    • jayt.org
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2009, 09:38:09 AM »
We're just into having a good time, while remaining safe. It has nothing to do with preaching, and everything to do with living to ride another day.

This thread was posted to help new riders understand how group rides *should* be run. It is not indicative of how all group rides are run.

If you wanted to set up a ride, which did not seem to conform to our usual rides, that is fine. You just needed to state upfront what kind of ride it is. You'll notice, if you go into some of the group ride threads, full ride info given in the first post. Typically we keep the speeds sane, and don't pass. If you were looking to up the ante a bit, state it up front. This gives each rider the choice to attend or not based on the qualifiers.

And when you show up criticizing, you are the one preaching.
-Jay

Offline jerrythi

  • Don't Mess with Texas!!
  • Administrator
  • I post a lot
  • *****
  • Posts: 2995
  • 2011 Concours 14 2001 DRZ 400E
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2009, 09:51:17 AM »
Nice presentation Jay, as a long time rider I was surprised to see that I didn't remember ALL my hand signals. this is a great refresher....     
Crosby Texas!

Offline Jeff

  • Iron Butt
  • Pit Crew
  • Post Whore
  • *****
  • Posts: 5351
  • Expert Agitator
    • AOL Instant Messenger - GearHd6
    • View Profile
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2009, 06:34:11 PM »
Wow that guy went off for no reason huh? Sheesh, his 1st post to.

Post #1 was merely a textbook version of how a group ride should go NOT how every CTRiders group ride goes. Relax and enjoy the site.
-Jeff

2015 Triumph Tiger XCx
1998 Triumph Daytona T595
2004 Honda CRF250X

Offline Jay

  • mmm...beer
  • Administrator
  • Post Whore
  • *****
  • Posts: 5131
    • View Profile
    • jayt.org
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #11 on: July 14, 2009, 07:08:28 PM »
I have to say, that is one of my pet peeves. Haven't hung around us enough to know who we are and how we ride, but assume since we discussed ride safety we must be a bunch of uptight pedestal preachers. If you've been on a ride with us, you would have some clue about what you are talking about.
-Jay

Offline GerryP

  • Ice Cream in his Veins
  • Pit Crew
  • Rossi Sr.
  • *****
  • Posts: 1824
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2009, 07:46:30 PM »
I have to say, that is one of my pet peeves. Haven't hung around us enough to know who we are and how we ride, but assume since we discussed ride safety we must be a bunch of uptight pedestal preachers. If you've been on a ride with us, you would have some clue about what you are talking about.


If that's the way he feel about us and has never met any of us or even been on one ride
About the nicest thing I can say in response  is  :-* my a**  :dickhead:
 


« Last Edit: July 14, 2009, 07:51:52 PM by GerryP »
2015 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Red)

Motorcycling - It's not about what you ride or how fast you ride....is all about the ICE CREAM!!

Offline jerrythi

  • Don't Mess with Texas!!
  • Administrator
  • I post a lot
  • *****
  • Posts: 2995
  • 2011 Concours 14 2001 DRZ 400E
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2009, 07:50:48 PM »
love the last smiley  (you know ...  the one thats happy to see guys like that)
Crosby Texas!

Offline Jay

  • mmm...beer
  • Administrator
  • Post Whore
  • *****
  • Posts: 5131
    • View Profile
    • jayt.org
Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
« Reply #14 on: July 20, 2009, 11:20:54 AM »
I added a sentence about what to do after the ride.
-Jay