CTRiders

Riding in the CT => Group Rides => Topic started by: Jay on August 20, 2008, 03:20:36 PM

Title: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Jay on August 20, 2008, 03:20:36 PM
This is a work in progress, please post anything you would like me to add.
This is based off the MSF guide, with additions form other sources.
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Motorcycling is primarily a solo activity, but for many, riding as a group -- whether with friends on a Sunday morning ride or with an organized motorcycle rally -- is the epitome of the motorcycling experience. Here are some tips to help ensure a fun and safe group ride:

Arrive prepared
Arrive on time with a full gas tank.

Hold a riders’ meeting
Discuss things like the route, rest and fuel stops, and hand signals (see diagrams on next page). Assign a lead and sweep (tail) rider. Both should be experienced riders who are well-versed in group riding procedures. The leader should assess everyone’s riding skills and the group’s riding style.

Keep the group to a manageable size
Ideally five to seven riders. If necessary, break the group into smaller sub-groups, each with a lead and sweep rider.

Ride prepared
At least one rider in each group should pack a cell phone, first-aid kit, and full tool kit, so the group is prepared for any problem that they might encounter.

Ride in formation The staggered riding formation (see diagram below) allows a proper space cushion between motorcycles so that each rider has enough time and space to maneuver and to react to hazards. The leader rides in the left third of the lane, while the next rider stays at least one second behind in the right third of the lane; the rest of the group follows the same pattern. A single-file formation is preferred on a curvy road, under conditions of poor visibility or poor road surfaces, entering/leaving highways, or other situations where an increased space cushion or maneuvering room is needed. As turns get sharper, or as visibility decreases, move back to a single file formation. You'll also want to use single file when entering or exiting a highway, at toll booths, or when roads have a rough or questionable surface. At intersections where you've come to a stop, tighten the formation to side-by-side to take up less space. As the light turns green, or when traffic opens up, the bike on the left proceeds through first.

(http://www.ctriders.org/Custom/formation.png)

Avoid side-by-side formations
as they reduce the space cushion. If you suddenly needed to swerve to avoid a hazard, you would not have room to do so. You don’t want handlebars to get entangled.

Periodically check the riders following in your rear view mirror
If you see a rider falling behind, slow down so they may catch up. If all the riders in the group use this technique, the group should be able to maintain a fairly steady speed without pressure to ride too fast to catch up.

If you’re separated from the group, don’t panic
Your group should have a pre-planned procedure in place to regroup.

Don’t break the law or ride beyond your skills to catch up
For mechanical or medical problems, use a cell phone to call for assistance as the situation warrants. If the group is riding faster than you are comfortable with, let the sweep rider know you're dropping out and ride at your own pace. So you may reach your destination a few seconds behind the others, but you will get there, and that's what's important. Keep in mind, it's all about fun.


Leader
The Lead Bike rides in the most forward position in the group and relays information to all other riders via hand signals. The Lead Bike determines the group's direction, speed, choice of lane and formation. He/she must often make quick navigation decisions in the face of road hazards, changes of road surface conditions, poor signage, construction and other obstacles while maintaining control of his/her own bike and communicating to those following in the group.

Setting the Pace: speed control is important and involves proper changes depending on circumstances. Open road speed should be paced at legal speed limits (or lower depending on conditions), pre-mature slowing should be used when approaching a turn or major change in lane position, and speed should be increased initially coming out of a turn to allow space for others to make the turn. Once the turn is made, speed should be maintained at 5 mph slower until the entire group is together and the Sweeper signals that the group is ready to proceed.

Knowing the Route: The planned route is important, and the destination is "all" important. Sometimes routes change based upon weather or road conditions. The Leader needs to know how to get the group to the final destination. Hopefully, the planned ride will suffice, but alternate routes need to be known.

Hand Signals: and the understanding of their usage is essential.

The Leader also works in conjunction with the Sweeper to insure that the ride is staying organized and together.

Sweeper
This very important position is often overlooked, but can be a critical part of the successful and safe group ride. The Sweeper sees all... because they take the "last" position in the group. And, the responsibilities of this position can be varied and multiple. Some European riding group go so far to make sure that the Sweeper has medical training as well. After all... if an accident occurs in the group, they are the first on the scene.

Signaling
The Sweeper communicates to the Leader, through hand signals, the status of the group. The most used signal is a fist high in the air signaling to the Leader that everyone is together and made it through that traffic light or turn. The Leader should "acknowledge" this by signaling back the same way. This also helps to remove the anxiety of the riders in the group, wondering how everyone is doing. Other signals can be used and should be discussed directly between the Leader and Sweeper to insure proper communication.

If the group becomes separated, the Sweeper now must jump to a lead position and become a Leader

Help
If there is a problem, it becomes the Sweeper's responsibility to oversee, and communicate appropriately so that help can be notified as necessary. Obviously, the Sweeper should be equipped with a cell phone, radio or device capable of doing so.

Signals

(http://www.ctriders.org/Custom/signals.png)

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Motorcycle riding is dangerous by nature. If you choose to partake in a CTRiders group ride, it is at your own risk. CTRiders will not be held accountable for reckless and dangerous riding. It is your choice to twist the throttle.

Most importantly: stay within your limits. There is no pressure to ride above your abilities.

After the Ride
After you have returned home from the ride, please check into the corresponding thread. We all would like to know you got home safely.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Yev on August 20, 2008, 03:30:11 PM
Very nice addition Jay..
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: CTBumpkin on August 20, 2008, 04:47:50 PM
In some parts of the state, patting your helmet means, "Po Po, slow down."
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: SkiMan on August 20, 2008, 05:10:46 PM
JB
Nice job on the outline
This type of stuff should be a mandatory read
and included in the rider safety course (none of this was covered when I took it)
This is going to get posted in the shop where I can see it and review
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Mr.P on August 22, 2008, 09:21:47 AM
Thanxs jb.Very informative.I too will have to keep it posted and review it from time to time.

Mr.P
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: beet on May 26, 2009, 09:36:00 AM
LOL tap on top of helmet used to be LEO spotted. ;D
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: GerryP on May 26, 2009, 10:35:54 AM


Let's not forget the "old" arm signals for left and right turns (which I try to as much as possible), after all bulbs burn out.

Gerry
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: hondanick52 on July 14, 2009, 09:28:34 AM
I was kind of looking forward to riding with you guys but it seams a little uptight for me, i ride in groups of 20 and we have no trouble staying together. It also seams like you are pretty adament about not breaking any laws while your with the group. why dont you come down off your responcible pedestal and have some fun. You must have known how at one time because you ride a motorcycle, seams to me tho that your a lil more into preaching than riding at this point.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Jay on July 14, 2009, 09:38:09 AM
We're just into having a good time, while remaining safe. It has nothing to do with preaching, and everything to do with living to ride another day.

This thread was posted to help new riders understand how group rides *should* be run. It is not indicative of how all group rides are run.

If you wanted to set up a ride, which did not seem to conform to our usual rides, that is fine. You just needed to state upfront what kind of ride it is. You'll notice, if you go into some of the group ride threads, full ride info given in the first post. Typically we keep the speeds sane, and don't pass. If you were looking to up the ante a bit, state it up front. This gives each rider the choice to attend or not based on the qualifiers.

And when you show up criticizing, you are the one preaching.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: jerrythi on July 14, 2009, 09:51:17 AM
Nice presentation Jay, as a long time rider I was surprised to see that I didn't remember ALL my hand signals. this is a great refresher....     
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Jeff on July 14, 2009, 06:34:11 PM
Wow that guy went off for no reason huh? Sheesh, his 1st post to.

Post #1 was merely a textbook version of how a group ride should go NOT how every CTRiders group ride goes. Relax and enjoy the site.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Jay on July 14, 2009, 07:08:28 PM
I have to say, that is one of my pet peeves. Haven't hung around us enough to know who we are and how we ride, but assume since we discussed ride safety we must be a bunch of uptight pedestal preachers. If you've been on a ride with us, you would have some clue about what you are talking about.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: GerryP on July 14, 2009, 07:46:30 PM
I have to say, that is one of my pet peeves. Haven't hung around us enough to know who we are and how we ride, but assume since we discussed ride safety we must be a bunch of uptight pedestal preachers. If you've been on a ride with us, you would have some clue about what you are talking about.


If that's the way he feel about us and has never met any of us or even been on one ride
About the nicest thing I can say in response  is  :-* my a**  :dickhead:
 


Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: jerrythi on July 14, 2009, 07:50:48 PM
love the last smiley  (you know ...  the one thats happy to see guys like that)
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Jay on July 20, 2009, 11:20:54 AM
I added a sentence about what to do after the ride.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Jeff on July 20, 2009, 05:58:59 PM
I added a sentence about what to do after the ride.

Good idea. After the nasty incident last year I think that procedure is definitely needed.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: slowpoke750 on July 22, 2009, 05:32:35 PM
I have to admit i did not know all the hand signals so i'm happy i check it out.

One question, tapping the top of your helmet... Does that also mean heads up for cop or accident? That is how i always knew it.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Jay on July 22, 2009, 05:33:26 PM
Top of helmet usually means po po.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: BoxDude on August 01, 2009, 04:52:41 PM
The Fuzz



70's ftw
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: sms on August 18, 2009, 10:05:14 PM
Good info- accidents happen a lot in group rides. I've been street riding for 18 years and I know of 5 accidents from group rides- two of them very serious. They all stemmed from riders not communicating during the ride and not following any protocol.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: John Lucky on September 13, 2009, 07:00:54 AM
If  there is a TRIKE in the group  ,you dont stager with it.  Also a Trike should be at the rear . Reason the brakes  are very strong and stopping distance is much less than a 2 wheeler. also add  to  #1 full tank of gas  and empty Bladder
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Jeff on September 13, 2009, 09:08:58 AM
If  there is a TRIKE in the group  ,you dont stager with it.  Also a Trike should be at the rear . Reason the brakes  are very strong and stopping distance is much less than a 2 wheeler. also add  to  #1 full tank of gas  and empty Bladder

Makes sense John.

Glad to see ya back by the way. Haven't seen you around in quite a while.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: unkalee on February 25, 2011, 07:53:23 PM

Let's not forget the "old" arm signals for left and right turns (which I try to as much as possible), after all bulbs burn out.

Gerry
Still use'm as some of the bikes don't have signals....
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: SueScoots on March 26, 2011, 06:22:16 PM
Great material and safety is always a priority when I ride.  Thanks.  I'll probably print it out and keep a copy in my scoot for reference before each group ride.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: ctbandit on March 31, 2011, 09:21:02 PM
If  there is a TRIKE in the group  ,you dont stager with it.  Also a Trike should be at the rear . Reason the brakes  are very strong and stopping distance is much less than a 2 wheeler. also add  to  #1 full tank of gas  and empty Bladder
I somehow can't imagine a trike stopping faster than any super sport or even most any lightweight motorcycle for that matter. Maybe some riders can't stop their bike on two wheels as fast, but its not the machine making them take longer to stop.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: dr1 on March 31, 2011, 10:43:08 PM
more rubber = more stoppy.. unless your rubber is connected to go cart brakes :)
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: JKStar on April 18, 2011, 11:20:53 AM
very informative thanks ;D
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: jerrythi on April 18, 2011, 11:50:43 AM
we are considering hand-outs at group rides...
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: GerryP on April 18, 2011, 12:06:25 PM
we are considering hand-outs at group rides...

I'm sure the fedgov would be happy to give  more hand-outs..
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: barrypz on April 18, 2011, 01:16:35 PM
I was thinking of putting up a whole etiquette thing so we could settle on the rules that would be ours.  First, I need to find something good as a starting point, but I know that kind of thing is out there.  Or we could go with Emily Post's rules for afternoon tea.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: barrypz on April 18, 2011, 03:45:25 PM
There is some stuff out there I'm starting to gather...

(http://www.ctriders.org/gallery/1/113_18_04_11_3_45_05.gif)

TICKED OFF:
Extend your left arm straight out with your elbow bent 90 degrees. Carefully extend your middle finger to clearly demonstrate your dissatisfaction with the other guy. NOTE: It is not recommended you do this when you are alone.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: jerrythi on April 18, 2011, 04:35:20 PM
There is some stuff out there I'm starting to gather...

([url]http://www.ctriders.org/gallery/1/113_18_04_11_3_45_05.gif[/url])

TICKED OFF:
Extend your left arm straight out with your elbow bent 90 degrees. Carefully extend your middle finger to clearly demonstrate your dissatisfaction with the other guy. NOTE: It is not recommended you do this when you are alone.


Signed Victory riders of america...........
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: SkiMan on April 18, 2011, 08:56:04 PM

I always thought that was the offical Harley howdy do!
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: jerrythi on April 18, 2011, 08:59:52 PM
I always thought that was the offical Harley howdy do!

 just kidding.  I couldn't flip anyone off on that thing...  its way too slow for a clean get away  :)
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Jay on April 18, 2011, 09:03:32 PM
just kidding.  I couldn't flip anyone off on that thing...  its way too slow for a clean get away  :)
I know the feeling.
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: SkiMan on April 18, 2011, 09:05:00 PM
Believe me.....I wouldn't either
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: barrypz on August 15, 2012, 08:01:19 PM
33 Secrets For Smart Touring


Motorcycle riding on curvy road.  There’s nothing like the feeling of loading up and heading out on a big motorcycle trip.

And there’s nothing like the security of knowing you’re prepared for life on the road.

It can take years to develop that knowledge through trial and error. So we’ve devised a shortcut. We’ve asked AMA staff members to share with you the experience they’ve accumulated over decades on the road.

What you’ll find here isn’t a comprehensive collection of touring knowledge. Instead, here are 33 insider tips—useful suggestions that have made our tours more organized and more fun. We guarantee you’ll learn something.

    Eat at weird times. Everyone and their dog eats around 8 a.m., noon and 6 p.m. To get in and out of restaurants in a hurry, don’t be hungry then.

    A short metal cable with loops on both ends (like those made to keep people from stealing bicycle seats) is perfect for securing a jacket and helmet to your bike’s helmet lock.

    Carry a spare key. Hide it somewhere on your bike with a zip-tie or duct tape, or better yet, trade spare keys with a traveling companion.

    Portable weather radios are now in the $20 range, and the first time one saves you from running right into a massive storm, you’ll wonder why you ever traveled without one. Find one at accessory companies like Aerostich or Radio Shack.

    On high-mileage days, you’ll feel a lot better if you carry eyedrops and use them every time you stop for gas.

    If you’re nearing the end of your riding day and want to set yourself up for a quick getaway in the morning, consider riding to the far side of the next city you reach before you stop for the night, eliminating urban traffic the next morning.

    Take a tip from off-road riders: carry a backpack hydration system so you can drink while you ride. A must for arid weather.

    Going on a long, complex trip? Keep yourself organized with the envelope system. Before you leave, prepare one envelope for each day on the road. Mark the dates and locations on the outside, then stuff things like hotel reservation info and lists of things to see inside. Instead of juggling your entire stack of literature to find the information you need, you can just open up that day’s envelope.

    A simple map case attached to your bike’s tank (we’ve used a Rev-Pak version that has been available through www.whitehorsepress.com for years) can keep you on course without the bulk of a tankbag.

    Keep your stuff dry in saddlebags by using trash compactor bags as waterproof barriers. They’re thicker and more durable than standard garbage bags.

    Use earplugs to help reduce wind noise. You can get them from most mail-order shops or dealers, or in bulk from safety-equipment supply houses.

    Don’t forget that pack-and-ship places are just about everywhere these days. They’re perfect when you spot that antique umbrella stand you’re dying to buy hundreds of miles from home.

    Don’t forget a small towel or rag for wiping dew off seats, windshields and mirrors, and even for doing a quick whole-bike cleanup. Synthetic chamois cloths work particularly well.

    Pack extra bungees and zip-ties. ’Nuff said.

    Go ahead, buy that GPS you’ve always wanted. They’re perfect not only for finding yourself, but also for allowing you the freedom to get lost in the first place.

    You’ve heard it a million times, but we’ll say it again: look over your bike carefully every morning on the road. Checking the simple stuff—air pressure, oil level, loose or missing fasteners—can save you from big trouble.

    Sign up for AMA Roadside Assistance. To sign up, call the AMA at: (614) 856-1900.

    Stash a little hidden cash somewhere on the bike or on you, so you can make something happen when all else fails.

    Before you take off from the hotel or campground in the morning, double check every strap on tankbags or soft saddlebags, and every latch on hard luggage.

    Wear a dog-tag with your name and contact info, especially if you’re riding alone. You can get them lots of places, including your local army surplus store.

    Take a look back at where you were parked every time you leave someplace. You’d be amazed at what you find.

    A cellphone can be a lifesaver in an emergency. You can dial 911 for help anywhere you find cell service, but you’ll need to tell a dispatcher where you are. Keep track of route numbers, interstate exits, towns you’ve passed, mileposts—anything that can save emergency officials time in getting to you.

    Good motorcycle gear really is worth it. Waterproof, breathable linings in boots and jackets will transform the way you think about bad weather. A number of companies offer materials that work well, but always test your gear on a rainy day at home before facing a storm on the road.

    Do routine maintenance at home with your bike’s toolkit, so you’re sure you have what you need along the side of the road.

    On a long tour, plan for at least one day every week of doing nothing. Time is the ultimate luxury, and can mean the difference between a vacation and an endurance run.

    Be realistic with your daily mileage. In really scenic areas, 150 miles may make a very full day. Don’t assume you can achieve freeway mileage on good back roads.

    Guidebooks can be invaluable, but these days, an internet search can add spice to your trip by revealing special-interest locations most books fail to include. One of the sites we’ve used is www.roadsideamerica.com. World’s largest concrete bison, anyone?

    It is possible to use a kit to make emergency repairs on tubeless or tube-type tires alongside the road. But before you count on this as your safety net, practice using the kit on an old tire in your garage.
    A packable motorcycle cover not only keeps your bike clean and dry overnight, it also discourages thieves. And don’t forget a stout lock of some kind for the bike itself.

    If you can afford it and are short of time, you could always ship your bike somewhere cool and ride it back. Call the Federal Companies at (800) 747-4100, ext. 217 or 218, for details.

    If you call a hotel--even if you're two blocks away--you can often get a better rate than if you just walk in. And if you have access to a computer, there are some spectacular Internet-only deals available these days. Either way, do yourself a favor and have a reservation by 4 p.m. You never know when a convention will take over your destination city. Remember that AMA members get a discount at several hotel chains including Choice Hotels (call 800-258-2847 or go to www.choicehotels.com, click on “Enter Special Rate ID” and use discount code 00947556) and Motel 6 (call 800-4-MOTEL6 or go to www.motel6.com and use discount code CP540176).

    A nap can do wonders on a long day.

    If you’re traveling east or west, schedule your breakfast or dinner times near sunrise or sunset so you don’t have to stare into the sun when it’s low on the horizon.

Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: jerrythi on August 15, 2012, 08:14:05 PM
words to live by.  literally!
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: SkiMan on August 15, 2012, 09:14:22 PM
good stuff there!
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: barrypz on May 22, 2013, 04:30:34 PM
Bike Bandit guide to group etiquette

http://www.bikebandit.com/community/articles/group-motorcycle-riding?fc_c=3116931x12832526x93701288&utm_source=Wednesday_Email_052213&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Group_Riding&utm_campaign=BB_News_052213&WT.mc_id=2799389#.UZ0qRqy8PIc
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: SkiMan on May 22, 2013, 05:05:43 PM
Barry, thanks for the refresher!
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Tazman2 on May 23, 2013, 09:10:41 AM
I don't see the middle finger signal....
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: barrypz on May 23, 2013, 09:36:32 AM
I don't see the middle finger signal....

I wanted to add that.
(http://www.ctriders.org/gallery/113_23_05_13_9_36_06.jpeg)
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: SkiMan on May 23, 2013, 12:14:02 PM
A glow in the dark one as well!
I liiiiiiike it!
Title: Re: Group Ride Ettiquete
Post by: Tazman2 on May 24, 2013, 10:22:23 AM
Veryyyyy niccccceeeeeee!!!! High Fivesss!!!!! :D